Nonprofits

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Nonprofit Fundraising-Team Efforts

Traditional methods

Special Events, Athletic, Direct Solicitation...

It is certainly important to develop relationships and maintain connections with donors. These activities are one time, high overhead events requiring regular, repetitive implementation to maintain financial support.  Once you get new donors, the need is present to strengthen their engagement with your nonprofit. 

Events are a fun and easy way to mobilize volunteers who aren't otherwise interested in fundraising, and there is certainly a time and place for them. But, alas, the bigger the event, the greater the risk of it producing a relatively low return after all the hours and other resources that go into them.

Direct sales...

Goods or services sold to regular (or charitable-minded) consumers. This can encompass anything from kids selling cookies, to museums running gift shops, to organizations providing their own clients with job training, perhaps in bicycle repair or Web design.  Again, these activities require considerable, continued, renewed manpower and financial underwriting.

Grants...

From other existing foundations --

Like-minded nonprofits are often started by wealthy families or corporations, that give out money for specific charitable purposes of their choosing. The grant is usually for a specific amount of money, either paid in advance or on a reimbursement basis.

 Government Grants

Local, state, and federal government agency grants are often high, so some nonprofits subsist almost entirely on government money. Being able to attract and keep government grants gives your group stature and credibility, thus helping you attract other funds.

The downside is the often overwhelming application requirements -- mounds of paperwork and added requirements such as the formation of oversight committees.

Endowments...

A potential benefit from all the above allowing perpetual income in support of nonprofits' purposes. 

Non-Traditional

Mechanisms do exist to:

Capitalize on cooperation rather than competition for funds.

Break down socio-economic barriers to participating in nonprofit support. 

Perpetuate donations in the long term.

Generate and maintain funds for the benefit of local communities while allowing for expansion in breadth and depth. 

See "Tools" tab...